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Saratoga Film Forum

320 Broadway
Saratoga Springs , NY 12866

 

The Saratoga Film Forum is a not-for-profit arts organization that offers the film-loving community of our upstate region an opportunity to enjoy and discuss high-quality films and other electronic media productions at a downtown venue in Saratoga.

MISSION:
The Saratoga Film Forum is a not-for-profit arts organization that offers the film-loving community of our upstate region an opportunity to enjoy and discuss high-quality films and other electronic media productions at a downtown venue in Saratoga Springs. Founded on principles of community involvement, our programming is curated for currency, balance, and diversity by members of our board and film enthusiasts. The Film Forum gives emphasis to enhanced “forum” events, which pair films with panels, lectures, concerts, and other presentations. The membership-supported, board-managed Film Forum welcomes audience suggestions and collaborative programming with other not-for-profit organizations and educational institutions. 

Saratoga Film Forum Brief History:

Saratoga Springs once boasted as many as three downtown movie houses. By the late Eighties, these had closed. In 1993, several Saratogians launched an initiative to open a welcoming, in-town, not-for-profit theater where people who loved movies could see and talk about top-caliber, hard-to-find films. A name was chosen, and a logo; a board was formed, we applied for and were granted 501c3 tax-exempt status, and had embarked on a fundraising drive to show films in a range of available downtown venues, including a local coffee house, a hotel ballroom, a drive-in movie theater, and an attic auditorium in City Hall.

The board-run, volunteer-staffed Saratoga Film Forum works hard to meet our founding goals. We have an active and committed membership, a volunteer base of forty, and our screenings draw moviegoers from many upstate counties. The forum events that enhance our films are flagged at our website. Our monthly postcard mailing, weekly e-mail updates, newspaper column, blog, Facebook and Twitter posts, keep viewers abreast of our latest events and screenings.

We strongly urge moviegoers and friends of the arts to join the not-for-profit Film Forum (a 501c3 organization) and enjoy the benefits of a tax-deductible Film Forum membership and the pleasure of supporting a vibrant downtown arts venue. Membership forms are downloadable at our website, www.saratogafilmforum.org.

Always get confirmation of the business location.
When: Today at 7:30 PM to 10:00 PM
Where: Saratoga Film Forum
Cost: $7.00
Jim Jarmusch's latest tells the tale of two fragile and sensitive vampires, Adam (Tom Hiddleston) and Eve (Tilda Swinton), who have been lovers for centuries. Both are cultured intellectuals with an all-embracing passion for music, literature, and science, who have evolved to a level where they no longer kill for sustenance, but still retain their innate wildness. Adam is a reclusive underground musician hiding out in the ruins of contemporary Detroit and despairs about human civilization's decline. The much older Eve (she's about 3,000 years old to Adam's youthful 500) takes a longer view of history and is more optimistic. She leaves her home in the ancient city of Tangier to come to his side. As blood has been tainted by the zombies (humans), the formerly immortal Adam and Eve must secure uncontaminated blood from hospitals or they will perish. Eve's close friend, Elizabethan dramatist and unacknowledged author of Shakespeare's plays-Christopher Marlowe (John Hurt), is now an elder vampire who provides Eve with hospital blood. Adam gets his supply from Dr. Watson (Jeffrey Wright), a skittish hematologist who provides safe blood at a price. Adam and Eve's precarious footing is further threatened by the uninvited arrival of Eve's carefree and uncontrollable little sister Ava (Mia Wasikowska). Unlike Adam and Eve, Ava hasn't yet learned to tame her wilder instincts, and her recklessness concerns Adam. Jarmusch's Only Lovers Left Alive is a meditation on art, science, memory, and the mysteries of everlasting love. "A vampire flick as only Jim Jarmusch would ever conceive it, languidly poetic, worldweary and crammed with hipster in-jokes." -Bob Mondello, NPR "Jarmusch, as ever, has the power to sneak up on you. He's a spellbinder. The same goes for his movie." -Peter Travers, Rolling Stone "It's so elegant and dreamlike-such a departure from most vampire epics-that you won't be bored. It also has a wicked sense of humor you usually don't find in the genre." -Rex Reed, New York Observer TICKETS: $7 STUDENTS/MEMBERS: $5
When: Sun, Nov 2, 2014 at 7:30 PM to 10:00 PM
Where: Saratoga Film Forum
Cost: $7.00
Written and directed by Ingmar Bergman ? 83 min. ? Sweden ? 1966 ? Not Rated ? In Swedish with English subtitles Curated by Terry Diggory, Skidmore College Ingmar Bergman's 1966 classic psychological drama stars Bibi Andersson as a young nurse named Alma, and Liv Ullmann as Elisabet Vogler, a well-known stage actress who has suddenly stopped talking, despite there being no organic cause. Nearly catatonic when she is admitted to the hospital, Elisabet is taken to a seaside cottage and Alma tries nurse her back to health. The relationship between the two women becomes strained and the border between dream and reality becomes blurred. By the end of the film the identities of Alma and Elisabeth appear to merge-conveyed throughout the film with the iconic images of the character's faces overlapping. Terry Diggory is Emeritus Professor of English and former department chair at Skidmore College, where he taught courses on modern poetry and drama. He has published widely on the relations between literature and visual art. Since his retirement, an extensive study of Bergman led to the publication of The Mother's Role in Bergman's Persona, online in Film International. Our Town & Gown series introduces moviegoers to film-savvy scholars from several colleges in our region whose work has been profoundly shaped by fine cinema, and invites them to present and discuss a film of their choice. This program has received funding from the Skidmore Office of Community Relations, and from the Saratoga Program for Arts Funding, administered by Saratoga Arts, and made possible by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Gov. Andrew Cuomo and the New York Legislature. "A film we return to over the years, for the beauty of its images and because we hope to understand its mysteries." -Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times TICKETS: $7 STUDENTS/MEMBERS: $5
When: Thu, Nov 6, 2014 at 7:30 PM to 10:00 PM
Where: Saratoga Film Forum
Cost: $7.00
Growing up, twins Maggie (Kristen Wiig) and Milo (Bill Hader) were inseparable. When they were teenagers, their father died, and they were forced to separate, leading to a decade-long estrangement. Now in their 30s, another set of near-tragedies-they both cheat death on the same day-brings them back together and they attempt to catch up on the lost time. Milo has become a frustrated actor with no prospects, and decides to accept his sister's offer to return to their upstate New York hometown. As it happens, though, Maggie herself is deeply unhappy despite her loving husband Lance (Luke Wilson). Their mother (Joanna Gleason), a new-age practitioner who refuses to recognize her children's pain, only seems to amplify just how little Maggie and Milo have recovered from the events of their childhood. Maggie flirts with her hunky Australian SCUBA instructor (Boyd Holbrook), and Milo revisits his high school English teacher Rich (Ty Burrell), with whom he had had an affair after his father's death. Rich, with a girlfriend and grown son, is initially not too pleased to see his old lover, but when Milo pretends to be a success, Rich considers rekindling their romance. Ultimately, Milo and Maggie come to realize that the only way to fix their lives is to fix their relationship with each other. "Warm, funny, heartfelt and even uplifting, the film is led by revelatory performances from Bill Hader and Kristen Wiig, both of them exploring rewarding new dramatic range without neglecting their mad comedic skills." -David Rooney, Hollywood Reporter "This is a smart movie. Wiig gives maybe the most impressive performance of her career, and Hader is equally good." -Richard Roeper, Richard Roeper.com "The two costars elevate the film?.Their onscreen rapport is infectious and believable." -Chris Nashawaty, Entertainment Weekly Craig Johnson was nominated for the Grand Jury Prize, and Craig Johnson and Mark Heyman won the Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival.
When: Fri, Nov 7, 2014 at 7:30 PM to 10:00 PM
Where: Saratoga Film Forum
Cost: $7.00
Growing up, twins Maggie (Kristen Wiig) and Milo (Bill Hader) were inseparable. When they were teenagers, their father died, and they were forced to separate, leading to a decade-long estrangement. Now in their 30s, another set of near-tragedies-they both cheat death on the same day-brings them back together and they attempt to catch up on the lost time. Milo has become a frustrated actor with no prospects, and decides to accept his sister's offer to return to their upstate New York hometown. As it happens, though, Maggie herself is deeply unhappy despite her loving husband Lance (Luke Wilson). Their mother (Joanna Gleason), a new-age practitioner who refuses to recognize her children's pain, only seems to amplify just how little Maggie and Milo have recovered from the events of their childhood. Maggie flirts with her hunky Australian SCUBA instructor (Boyd Holbrook), and Milo revisits his high school English teacher Rich (Ty Burrell), with whom he had had an affair after his father's death. Rich, with a girlfriend and grown son, is initially not too pleased to see his old lover, but when Milo pretends to be a success, Rich considers rekindling their romance. Ultimately, Milo and Maggie come to realize that the only way to fix their lives is to fix their relationship with each other. "Warm, funny, heartfelt and even uplifting, the film is led by revelatory performances from Bill Hader and Kristen Wiig, both of them exploring rewarding new dramatic range without neglecting their mad comedic skills." -David Rooney, Hollywood Reporter "This is a smart movie. Wiig gives maybe the most impressive performance of her career, and Hader is equally good." -Richard Roeper, Richard Roeper.com "The two costars elevate the film?.Their onscreen rapport is infectious and believable." -Chris Nashawaty, Entertainment Weekly Craig Johnson was nominated for the Grand Jury Prize, and Craig Johnson and Mark Heyman won the Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival.
When: Sun, Nov 9, 2014 at 7:30 PM to 10:00 PM
Where: Saratoga Film Forum
Cost: $7.00
Growing up, twins Maggie (Kristen Wiig) and Milo (Bill Hader) were inseparable. When they were teenagers, their father died, and they were forced to separate, leading to a decade-long estrangement. Now in their 30s, another set of near-tragedies-they both cheat death on the same day-brings them back together and they attempt to catch up on the lost time. Milo has become a frustrated actor with no prospects, and decides to accept his sister's offer to return to their upstate New York hometown. As it happens, though, Maggie herself is deeply unhappy despite her loving husband Lance (Luke Wilson). Their mother (Joanna Gleason), a new-age practitioner who refuses to recognize her children's pain, only seems to amplify just how little Maggie and Milo have recovered from the events of their childhood. Maggie flirts with her hunky Australian SCUBA instructor (Boyd Holbrook), and Milo revisits his high school English teacher Rich (Ty Burrell), with whom he had had an affair after his father's death. Rich, with a girlfriend and grown son, is initially not too pleased to see his old lover, but when Milo pretends to be a success, Rich considers rekindling their romance. Ultimately, Milo and Maggie come to realize that the only way to fix their lives is to fix their relationship with each other. "Warm, funny, heartfelt and even uplifting, the film is led by revelatory performances from Bill Hader and Kristen Wiig, both of them exploring rewarding new dramatic range without neglecting their mad comedic skills." -David Rooney, Hollywood Reporter "This is a smart movie. Wiig gives maybe the most impressive performance of her career, and Hader is equally good." -Richard Roeper, Richard Roeper.com "The two costars elevate the film?.Their onscreen rapport is infectious and believable." -Chris Nashawaty, Entertainment Weekly Craig Johnson was nominated for the Grand Jury Prize, and Craig Johnson and Mark Heyman won the Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival.
When: Mon, Nov 10, 2014 at 7:30 PM to 10:00 PM
Where: Saratoga Film Forum
Cost: $7.00
Today, roughly 50 percent of the world's population lives in urban areas. By 2050, that figure is expected to rise to 80 percent. Life in a major city has its advantages-as well as its problems. But then not all cities are created equal; unwalkable Los Angeles, for example, with its isolating, car-worshipping sprawl differs from, say, Copenhagen, which has public spaces that allow the citizenry to mix. Meanwhile, we face peak oil, climate change, loneliness, and health issues, all stemming from our way of life. But why? Danish architect and professor Jan Gehl has studied human behavior in cities for the past 40 years. In this new documentary, Andreas Dalsgaard takes a concrete (ahem) look at modern urban living, documenting how modern cities deter human interaction to our detriment as a race. Gehl-and the film-argue that we can build cities in a way that takes human needs for inclusion and intimacy into account. Following the screening, we will present a panel discussion. Please check back here for participants closer to showtime. Underwriting for our "In the Public Interest!" Movie Series comes from the Adirondack Trust Company Community Fund. The Film Forum is grateful for ATC's support. "No documentary I've seen about city planning has come at the topic from such a resolutely humanistic perspective, or given me more hope for the future." -J. R. Jones, Chicago Reader